The future of the left since 1884

Search results

The spirit of give and take

For a technical report of a government committee, the popularity and influence of the Beveridge Report has probably never been exceeded in British history. It sold 100,000 copies within weeks of publication, and racked up over 600,000 sales in total,...

Who was William Beveridge?

70 years ago, at one of the darkest moments of the second world war, an obscure interdepartmental report on Social Insurance and Allied Services, composed by a temporary wartime civil servant, William Beveridge, suddenly shot to fame as what was...

Breadline Britain and the big society

This week, as part of a London assembly investigation I am leading in to food poverty, results from a survey of teachers in London were published. This revealed that over 95 per cent of those teachers who responded said that...

The next welfare settlement

Listening to most commentary about the British welfare state might leave you depressed, fearing that the legacy of Sir William Beveridge’s 1942 report is all but dead. But in spite of legitimate and troubling concerns, ‘follow the money ’ and...

Why the welfare uprating bill is bad economics

Much of the reaction to the chancellor’s decision to uprate most working age benefits and tax credits by just 1 per cent per annum for three years has focussed on questions of distribution. As the Resolution Foundation analysis demonstrated 60...

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close